DEVTOME.COM HOSTING COSTS HAVE BEGUN TO EXCEED 115$ MONTHLY. THE ADMINISTRATION IS NO LONGER ABLE TO HANDLE THE COST WITHOUT ASSISTANCE DUE TO THE RISING COST. THIS HAS BEEN OCCURRING FOR ALMOST A YEAR, BUT WE HAVE BEEN HANDLING IT FROM OUR OWN POCKETS. HOWEVER, WITH LITERALLY NO DONATIONS FOR THE PAST 2+ YEARS IT HAS DEPLETED THE BUDGET IN SHORT ORDER WITH THE INCREASE IN ACTIVITY ON THE SITE IN THE PAST 6 MONTHS. OUR CPU USAGE HAS BECOME TOO HIGH TO REMAIN ON A REASONABLE COSTING PLAN THAT WE COULD MAINTAIN. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SUPPORT THE DEVTOME PROJECT AND KEEP THE SITE UP/ALIVE PLEASE DONATE (EVEN IF ITS A SATOSHI) TO OUR DEVCOIN 1M4PCuMXvpWX6LHPkBEf3LJ2z1boZv4EQa OR OUR BTC WALLET 16eqEcqfw4zHUh2znvMcmRzGVwCn7CJLxR TO ALLOW US TO AFFORD THE HOSTING.

THE DEVCOIN AND DEVTOME PROJECTS ARE BOTH VERY IMPORTANT TO THE COMMUNITY. PLEASE CONTRIBUTE TO ITS FURTHER SUCCESS FOR ANOTHER 5 OR MORE YEARS!

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

a_fundamental_overview_of_network_technologies_part_i [2014/04/10 20:41]
ecafe [Introduction to TCP/IP]
a_fundamental_overview_of_network_technologies_part_i [2014/04/10 20:50] (current)
ecafe [Introduction to TCP/IP]
Line 297: Line 297:
 Looking closer into a TCP/IP address and you will learn the two major parts of the address are the network ID and the host ID. The network ID identifies the network segment an address belongs to, therefore all members of the same network segment must have the same network ID. The host ID identifies the unique address of the host on the network segment. For an easy way to remember what side of the address the network ID is on, just remember it comes first on the left side of the address. The right side of the TCP/IP address will contain the host ID. Looking closer into a TCP/IP address and you will learn the two major parts of the address are the network ID and the host ID. The network ID identifies the network segment an address belongs to, therefore all members of the same network segment must have the same network ID. The host ID identifies the unique address of the host on the network segment. For an easy way to remember what side of the address the network ID is on, just remember it comes first on the left side of the address. The right side of the TCP/IP address will contain the host ID.
  
-There are various methods to calculate what the numbers mean in TCP/IP but unless you are very good at binary math it will not mean that much to you. In addition to relative positioning of numbers in the TCP/IP address, there is kind of a floating number system called sub netting that can change the meaning of the address. Without having a clear understanding of TCP/ IP subnetting it will be very difficult trying to figure out binary math by hand. The easiest way to figure out your TCP/IP addresses and practice learning how to read them is getting yourself a TCP/IP calculator.+There are various methods to calculate what the numbers mean in TCP/IP but unless you are very good at binary math it will not mean that much to you. In addition to relative positioning of numbers in the TCP/IP address, there is kind of a floating number system called subnetting that can change the meaning of the address. Without having a clear understanding of TCP/IP subnetting it will be very difficult trying to figure out binary math by hand. The easiest way to figure out your TCP/IP addresses and practice learning how to read them is getting yourself a TCP/IP calculator.
  
 A TCP/IP calculator is a calculator specialized for figuring out TCP/IP addresses. They have them for purchase at the computer shop or you might be able to find a good one online to use. The calculator needs you to input the TCP/IP address you want more information about. Then you need to input or tell the calculator what subnet mask you have for the address. When the calculator is finished it will give you more information about your address like your internet address class, network ID and the host ID. A TCP/IP calculator is a calculator specialized for figuring out TCP/IP addresses. They have them for purchase at the computer shop or you might be able to find a good one online to use. The calculator needs you to input the TCP/IP address you want more information about. Then you need to input or tell the calculator what subnet mask you have for the address. When the calculator is finished it will give you more information about your address like your internet address class, network ID and the host ID.
Line 311: Line 311:
 *The class C default subnet mask is 255.255.255.0   *The class C default subnet mask is 255.255.255.0  
  
-The 255 part marks the first octet as a class A network. In subnetting it is helpful to think of the 255 as blocking out all that part of the TCP/ IP address. The part of the subnet mask where the zero is, represents the host ID part of the address. Now this is where it gets trickier as you encounter more complicated subnets that modify the amount of available hosts.  You might see masks like this 255.255.224.0+The 255 part marks the first octet as a class A network. In subnetting it is helpful to think of the 255 as blocking out all that part of the TCP/IP address. The part of the subnet mask where the zero is, represents the host ID part of the address. Now this is where it gets trickier as you encounter more complicated subnets that modify the amount of available hosts.  You might see masks like this 255.255.224.0
  
 One might think why does the third octet say 224? It is because the subnet has been modified to change the number of networks and hosts available on the network. This is the point where if you understand binary math you will be just fine. If this is just getting too complex it is ok, just use a subnetting calculator like mentioned before and don’t get involved with the math. The main concepts here are what are most important. One might think why does the third octet say 224? It is because the subnet has been modified to change the number of networks and hosts available on the network. This is the point where if you understand binary math you will be just fine. If this is just getting too complex it is ok, just use a subnetting calculator like mentioned before and don’t get involved with the math. The main concepts here are what are most important.
Line 318: Line 318:
 The most important pieces of information for configuring a host device with TCP/IP are the IP address, a subnet mask, and a default gateway. Many times this information only needs to be configured manually when using static information given to you by a network administrator or if you are making your own network. DHCP will most of the time auto configure all of the TCP/IP information you need on a host device so do not worry. The most important pieces of information for configuring a host device with TCP/IP are the IP address, a subnet mask, and a default gateway. Many times this information only needs to be configured manually when using static information given to you by a network administrator or if you are making your own network. DHCP will most of the time auto configure all of the TCP/IP information you need on a host device so do not worry.
  
-Some people claim they are confused by TCP/ IP version 6, but in fact I have been looking forward to it for many years. Although it looks more complex than regular TCP/IP version 4, it is much easier in many ways. There are lots more addresses available so no more subnetting is necessary. Next time in A Fundamental Overview of Network Technologies – Part II we will take a closer look at TCP/ IP version 6 and more technology subjects.+Some people claim they are confused by TCP/IP version 6, but in fact I have been looking forward to it for many years. Although it looks more complex than regular TCP/IP version 4, it is much easier in many ways. There are lots more addresses available so no more subnetting is necessary. Next time inA Fundamental Overview of Network Technologies – Part IIwe will take a closer look at TCP/IP version 6 and some more interesting technology subjects.
  
  

QR Code
QR Code a_fundamental_overview_of_network_technologies_part_i (generated for current page)
 

Advertise with Anonymous Ads